Headaches And Head Issues: When Not To Image

It can be hard to know when a headache should prompt medical evaluation. Rules have been developed helping medical professionals determine when imaging will be most beneficial. if a headache has other symptoms associated with it (such as nausea or vomiting) or is new, significantly worse or comes on suddenly, medical evaluation is warranted and imaging may be needed.

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Medical Imaging Technology Generates $3 Billion In Economic Activity For Washington State

The medical imaging technology industry supports an estimated 12,124 jobs in the state of Washington and generates approximately $3.1 billion in total economic activity according to a report commissioned by the Medical Imaging & Technology Alliance. This activity creates an additional 5,169 jobs elsewhere in the U.S.

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New X-Ray Imaging System Developed To See Live How Effective Treatments Are For Cystic Fibrosis

It can take several months to measure how effective treatment is for Cystic Fibrosis, the early-fatal lung disease, but now a new imaging method allows live viewing to monitor treatment. “Because we will be able to see how effectively treatments are working straight away, we’ll be able to develop new treatments a lot more quickly, and help better treat people with cystic fibrosis,” said lead researcher, Dr Morgan.

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Pelvic X-Ray May Not Be Necessary For Children With Blunt Torso Trauma

Pelvic x-rays for children who have suffered blunt force trauma are do not accurately identify all cases of pelvic fractures or dislocations. A study published online in Annals of Emergency Medicine casts doubt on a practice that has been recommended by the Advanced Trauma Life Support Program (ATLS). “Because of concerns about lifetime exposure to radiation in children, appropriate use of radiography is important. We just could not find enough accuracy or utility to justify the pelvic x-ray for most of these children,” said lead study author Maria Kwok, MD, MPH, of Columbia University Medical Center in New York, N.Y.

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Mammography Reduces Late Stage Breast Cancer

A study published in Cancer found that the number of people diagnosed with advanced-stage breast cancer has decreased by 37 percent since health care providers begain using mammography. Researchers from the University of Michigan produced the report. The study also found that the number of early-stage diagnoses increased 48 percent.

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ASTRO And AAPM Launch Incident Reporting System

The American Society for Radiation Oncology and the American Association of Physicists in Medicine have announced the launch of a national initiative to facilitate safer and higher-quality radiation oncology care. The secure reporting system called RO-ILS: Radiation Oncology Incident Learning System, will provide data to educate the radiation oncology community about practice risks and how to improve safety and patient care.

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Child Centered Protocols Proposed For Safe Imaging

The Mayo Clinic is leading a collaborative effort to ensure a national protocol is put into action to ensure that children receive the right exam, ordered the right way with the right radiation dose. A commentary, published online in the Journal of Patient Safety, calls for the American College of Radiology, the Joint Commission, the Intersociety Accreditation Commission, and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to require three safety practices for accreditation of all American hospitals and advanced diagnostic imaging facilities.

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CT Use Slashed in Pediatric Appendicitis with Simple Algorithm

A simple diagnostic algorithm for pediatric acute appendicitis decreased the use of imaging, including CT, without reducing diagnostic accuracy, according to a study presented earlier this year in Surgery online. “Given the concern for increased risk of cancer after CT, these results support use of an algorithm in children with suspected appendicitis,” wrote the authors.

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Advanced CT Scanners Reduce Patient Radiation Exposure

Computed tomography scans are an accepted standard of care for diagnosing heart and lung conditions. But clinicians worry that the growing use of CT scans could be placing patients at a higher lifetime risk of cancer from radiation exposure. A new study of 2,085 patients published in the online issue of the Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, found that the use of advanced CT scanning equipment is helping to address this important concern.

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